Archive for job search


By Anna D. Banks, GCDF

Staying constantly motivated and being able to handle rejection easily are the cornerstones of success with any kind of job-search. This is more so, for the mature worker seeking post-retirement employment, wanting to re-enter the workforce after a gap, or simply choosing to change their field of work.

Nothing puts your self-esteem more in jeopardy than a job search. Any job search can lead to self-doubt on a regular, daily basis. And this is especially true of job search at an older age, when you might doubt your own capabilities, your new market knowledge and may have to compete with younger fresher candidates. On the other hand, hiring managers, while they may value experience, are looking for cheerful and positive people. As a result, being visibly motivated is doubly important. If you are not motivated, the lack of motivation may be visible, and this self-doubt can lose you a good job opportunity.

Some things that you can do to help you maintain a positive attitude are:

• Spruce up your resume. Get help if necessary to polish and create a truly impressive, interesting resume. Rather than chronological, try a thematic approach; group type of work and responsibilities together rather than giving a simple date-wise list of employers. Once your resume sparkles, you will have much more self-confidence and find that you actually look forward to the job search.

• Remember to schedule “downtime.” Even when you are making 30 calls a day, sending any number of resumes, and checking every possible online jobsite, set some time apart, to do the things you enjoy. Go see a movie, take a trip with your spouse, or go out with friends. This will rejuvenate you for another day in the trenches.

• Make a ‘to-do’ list. Most people tend to work better with a set of specific guidelines. Writing down a list of the tasks you want to accomplish, not only helps you to organize your day, but also can be a morale lifter. Crossing the accomplished items off the list can give you a small morale boost each time.

• Tackle the fear. Most lack of motivation or procrastination comes from fear of rejection. Ask yourself what is the worst that could happen? On a call, for example, the worst is that they might hang up on you. A few hang ups, or “no thanks” are a small price to pay for the leads you can generate by regular networking and follow up.

• Post a picture of your children, your dream home, the yacht you want to buy, right next to your computer, reminding you everyday, why you want to work.
Alternatively, put some kind of an action figure symbolizing the county sheriff who wants to auction off your house if the bank forecloses.

• Remember that networking is a numbers game. Every single phone call or enquiry is not going to give you a lead on a job. Keep making those calls. Get out your Rolodex and make as many as six calls an hour, five hours a day. At the end of each all, ask them for references of people you should be talking to. This will generate more leads and increase the size of your network.

Anna D. Banks, a passionate advocate for baby boomers in exploring their priorities, planning and setting goals for the next stage of their lives. Assisting her clients to attract and build a professional and personal life consistent with their values is not just a goal of Anna’s, it’s her passion. Her diverse work experience in business, education and financial services enables her to help the diverse population of baby-boomers with their life, career, and personal finance coaching needs. Anna is currently Adjunct Faculty at Essex County College, where she teaches Career Development & Management.

Author’s Note:
Do you have any questions about career development or lifestyle changes for Baby Boomers, which you think others, like you, would want to know the answers? Post a comment on www.AnnaBanks.com or email your questions to me at Anna@AnnaBanks.com.

Comments (0)


Anna D. Banks, EzineArticles.com Basic Author

By Anna D. Banks, GCDF

Recent surveys have shown that there are more seniors who are now returning or sticking on to their jobs than ever before! Today, there are more 50+ workers working in the job market than at any time in the past. The terms ‘white-collar’ and ‘blue-collar’ workers have now been joined by a third adage, which is, ‘The Silver-collar worker’.

With over 77 million baby boomers in the United States and only 45 million Generation-X’ers, the difference in numbers clearly define a wide gap that needs to be filled by various strategies. So, the competition in the workplace between the two generations has increased twofold over the past ten years. So, if you happen to be a baby boomer on the look out for a job, then here are a couple of resume, cover letter and interview strategies to help you get started:

Resume Strategies for the 50+

• The thumb rule for all senior workers is to put at least 15 years worth of service on the resume.
• Don’t emphasize on dates. Never list your birth date and omit all college graduation dates that are more than 10 years old.
• Try toning down the job titles that you have listed on your resume so as to not seem overqualified. For instance, you can put down ‘senior manager’ instead of ‘Vice President’.
• Make sure you list all the professional courses and development activities that you have attended as this shows that you are willing to learn.
• List all the technological and computer skills that you possess.
• Highlight accomplishments, achievements and results that set you apart from the other candidates.

Cover Letter Strategies for Senior Workers

• Older workers tend to be proud of their work histories and are prone to putting self-applauding statements in their cover letters. With so much work experience, it is probably best you don’t put such cumulative experience statements in your cover letter. Instead of bragging, stick to using statements like ‘extensive experience’ or ‘significant experience’.
• An autobiography letter that rehashes your entire job history that is already on your resume isn’t a good idea. But, as an older worker it is more harmful as it draws attention to your age.
• Add in your cover letter that you are flexible, adaptable and are willing to learn.

Job Interview Strategies for Older Workers

When you go for a job interview, remember that you will probably be interviewed by someone who is younger than you, so don’t get embarrassed or unnerved by the situation.

• Start by stressing on how you are so willing to work and learn. Interviews claim that the biggest setback when it comes to hiring older workers is that most of the time their skills are outdated and they aren’t willing to learn.
• Suggest that you have an unsurpassable work ethic, which could be possible as compared to the younger workers.
• Convince you potential employers that your maturity will only be advantageous to them as your past experience makes you wiser in problem-solving situations.

© 2008 Anna D. Banks, GCDF

ANNA D. BANKS, GCDF, is a passionate advocate for baby boomers in exploring their priorities, planning and setting goals for the next stage of their lives. Assisting her clients to attract and build a professional and personal life consistent with their values is not just a goal of Anna’s, it’s her passion. Her diverse work experience in business, education and financial services enables her to help the diverse population of baby-boomers with their life, career, and personal finance coaching needs. Anna is currently Adjunct Faculty at Essex County College, where she teaches Career Development & Management. Please place a post on www.AnnaBanks.com or email your questions to me at Anna@AnnaBanks.com.
________
Author’s Note:
Do you have any questions about career development or lifestyle changes for Baby Boomers, which you think others, like you, would want to know the answers? Please place a post on www.AnnaBanks.com or email your questions to me at Anna@AnnaBanks.com.

Comments (2)

By Anna D. Banks, GCDF


Categories : Careers, Success Skills
Comments (0)